A More Efficient National Health Service Can Be Achieved With Managed And Secure File Transfer

In today’s environment of cost-cutting and improved productivity within the health service, anything that can assist with improved efficiency, reliability and security is a must. When transferring data between different parts of the service, secure file transfer helps meet compliance requirements and gives peace of mind.

Managed or secure file transfer is transpiring to be one of the best file transfer mechanisms for the modern healthcare organisation. It allows units to protect patient data, and be compliant, reliable and to improve productivity in the IT department.

Taking community care as an example of how it can be a boon, the transfer of information between a local surgery, the consultant, community nurse and the patient can all be optimised. Managed and secure file transfer enables the most up to date information to be transferred in-tact, on time and with a complete audit and transfer log.

Local health services and their associated authorities communicate regularly, and all the time, there is the need to protect the personal and health data of their patients. With traditional hard copy files and folders this can be rather challenging as it may be that some information needs to be redacted and sometimes the files or reports are solely written for one purpose but being required for another use. Alterations can mean that information is incomplete or wrong and data can be leaked or lost. Any or all of these possibilities can place the patient at risk.

Using a courier can also be problematic for some of the same reasons as files can be misplaced, spoiled or taken. When sending files by email there can be further problems with the email being sent to the wrong address, interruptions in sending and untraceable progress and access. Their size can also be a problem as this can put too much strain on the server.

Managed and secure file transfer have the capabilities of ‘curing’ these problems. Up to date information can be easily shared between interested parties and carers. It allows groups to share data, whether they have a thousand computers or just a single one. It also allows the owner of the data to see when it has been accessed, by whom and how. This is usually an essential element of compliance and allows everyone in the organisation to have the confidence to share data around.

Whether local or central, the health service is a complex organisation with a multitude of files, varying in size and with a number of professionals needing access to them. The audit trails provided by secure and managed file transfer mean that the Data Protection Act can be adhered to with great ease.

Mental Health Services – Providing Tools That Help You Tackle Life’s Challenges

If you have been battling anxiety, depression, anger, grief, relationship problems, or substance abuse you can receive mental health services from a trusted and reputable charity organization. The behavior health services you can receive are by professionals who are licensed, trained, and highly qualified. No matter what your problems, there is a solution for you out there. Some of the amazing behavioral health services you may be able to receive can include:

• Premarital preparation
• Domestic violence group counseling
• Substance abuse treatment
• Individual, family, and child counseling

This charity organization may collaborate with other partners and agencies to meet the different needs of communities and clients which may include state and local funding contracts and sources to deliver services.

Many charity organizations provide assistance for families and individuals regardless of their religion or background. These professionals can provide help to those who need in which may include, but not limited to, mental health services. The well – trained staff at this charity organization is committed to empowering individuals and improving their lives by helping them reach their goals.

This type of organization works to create a safe and nurturing family environment for both adults and children in addition to improving the community by specific outreach programs. The emphasis of this organization is child welfare, community outreach, mental health services, and family preservation. The community outreach programs may consist of pantry and food programs in addition to social ministry goals. The behavioral health programs may consist of programs that will provide child safety such as foster care and adoption. The family preservation programs offered by the charity organization may include programs that will strengthen families.

A nonprofit organization is one that typically relies on the generosity of many volunteers, corporation, families, foundations, and individuals. The mental health services you may be able to receive to include foster parenting, volunteer service, financial contributions, and donations.

If you are in need of family counseling from the charity organization, a highly trained therapists can provide you, your child, or entire family with the therapy support and counseling you need. Everyone goes through periods when they need someone to help them sort out their feeling and thoughts, and organization can do just that.

If you are dealing with issues that may cause you to need mental health services, you can contact a reputable services, charity organization and see if they can provide you with the help you need.

Mental Health Services

Mental health problems are common with around 25% of the population believed to be suffering from some form of mental health problem at any point in time. Anyone suffering from a mental health problem can access proper treatment and most who do seek help will make a complete recovery but unfortunately, there are still people who are afraid of admitting that they cannot cope or that they need help and will suffer unnecessary mental distress due to lack of understanding about their illness or awareness of what help is available. So what mental health services are available to anyone suffering from mental illness?

Doctor

The first point of contact is your doctor. They will be able to make a full assessment of your symptoms and your physical and mental health in general as well as take into consideration any other factors involved including any family history of mental illness in order to make an accurate diagnosis because an accurate diagnosis is essential if the right help and assistance is to be offered. For most people, a simple visit to the doctor may be all that is required to put them on the road to recovery.

However, your doctor might feel that you could also benefit from other mental health services so once he or she has made a diagnosis they will be able to start you on a suitable treatment programme which could include medication and/or referral to other professionals or specialists in the community mental health team as required, for example, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, various types of counsellors or therapists and so on.

The Community Mental Health Team (CMHT)

It may be that you require specialist skills in order to help you cope with your mental illness and as one person couldn’t conceivably be an expert in every single area, you could be referred to someone in the community mental health team. The community mental health team will vary depending on which area that you live, some may be attached to a hospital or work from a doctors surgery and others could possibly have their own clinic in a separate building but typically, they consist of professionals such as psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses who may also be trained to deal with specific problems or behaviours, clinical psychologists, occupational therapists, social workers, and various other therapists and counsellors.

It is quite likely that one person will be appointed as your key worker and will be liaising with you on a regular basis and visiting you at home. This person could be a social worker, a nurse, some type of therapist or quite commonly, a community psychiatric nurse or CPN.

The CPN will assess your progress on a regular basis, will identify and help you deal with any problems you might have and put you in touch with others who can help, they will monitor your mediation and any effects of that medication and will generally offer support. They will work closely with other professionals in the team so that everyone is aware of any particular issues or challenges that need to be dealt with. The CMHT will also regularly inform your doctor about your progress, your medication and any other issues involved in your case.

It might be that you need help from other professionals. For example, an occupational therapist can help you regain some independence in your life if you are suffering from any disabilities, they can help you to do things for yourself and improve your confidence in areas such as dressing, washing and other practical skills. Social workers can help with many social problems such as housing needs, financial issues and maybe parenting or child care challenges. Basically, the Community Mental Health Team enables you to access the right kind of help from professionals who are trained in a specific area.

Hospital

It might be that you need to spend some time in hospital to get over a particularly difficult episode of mental illness or where it is considered appropriate but this decision is not taken lightly. Hospitals can offer safety and protection and many people will voluntarily admit themselves to hospital in order to get the right assistance and support. However, there are also compulsory admissions made under the Mental Health Act in order to protect the person themselves or those around them. For some people, the thought of admission to hospital can be frightening but it is important to remember that a stay in hospital can be a lifesaver and hospitals are there to help and are better equipped to deal with particularly severe cases of mental illness.

More support

Family and friends can be instrumental in helping someone who is suffering from mental health problems to progress and regain control of their lives and as such are an extremely important part of any support network. There are also numerous other agencies, support organisations, and charities offering help to people suffering from various mental health problems. Some will also tackle issues related to mental health by raising awareness in the community and others can provide information, advice and support to people who are affected by mental health problems in their family. You can ask your doctor or mental health professional what other assistance is available in your area.

Beyond the Community Mental Health Service Improvement Act

As demand for mental health and addictions treatment grows, insurance coverage must be preserved and expanded. It’s critical that we preserve the guarantee of Medicaid coverage for low income, disabled Americans. Commercial parity must be passed; Medicare parity must follow; and if we accept what research is teaching us–that addictions are chronic, relapsing conditions that require ongoing monitoring and management, just like diabetes, asthma, and yes like mental illnesses–then we must act. We must lead the fight to restore eligibility for social security disability for people with addiction disorders.

Data collected by non-profit organizations documents increased demand and increased numbers of uninsured. States reallocated their general fund mental health dollars to the Medicaid match. And now state plans to cover the uninsured are floundering. This leaves large numbers of individuals with treatable mental illnesses in our overburdened emergency rooms and without access to the services that can engage them, treat them, and return them to work.

We’re denying our economy productive taxpayers. We’re wasting human lives. We must introduce and champion a federal funding stream to cover the mental health and addictions treatment costs of the uninsured.

The Community Mental Health Service Improvement Act begins to address our workforce crisis, but it’s just a beginning.

We cannot stand by and watch our best and brightest become plastic surgeons and investment bankers. Skilled staff demands adequate compensation. We must be attractive to leaders that reflect the diversity of our communities. And we can’t allow people with serious mental illnesses or addictions to wait for weeks and months for an appointment with a psychiatrist. We must be clear and forceful advocates for cost based reimbursement that supports salaries that can attract and retain skilled staff.

If we truly want to narrow the gap between science and service, we must stop investing in manuals and planning grants, and start investing in retooling the organizations that deliver services.

We must preserve, strengthen and expand the mental health and addictions treatment capacity in this country. But it has not been and it will not be easy.

We are part of a healthcare system that reflects the American belief in the marketplace. A healthcare system that talks universal coverage but hates taxes. A healthcare system that resists cost containment, counting on disease management and prevention for savings, although so far they show little evidence of delivering savings. A healthcare system that’s promoting “medical homes” as the newest cost saving strategy, confusing a strategy to improve the quality of care with one that saves money.

But we do know something about saving money. Pioneering studies are telling us that there are enormous disparities in healthcare expenditures from one region of our country to another, with no difference in healthcare outcomes. If the entire nation could bring its costs down to match the lower spending regions, we would cut 20 to 30 percent off America’s healthcare bill. Most of the difference in spending is for hospital care. Hospitalization, including inpatient psychiatric care, is a vital intervention that must be available but in many communities we can do better.

If we’re serious about improving consumer outcomes, point of service is where improvement will occur.

What is the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant Program?

The Community Mental Health Services Block Grant is authorized by Part B of Title XIX of the Public Health Service Act and is the single largest Federal contribution dedicated to improving mental health service systems across the country. The Center for Mental Health Services’ Community Mental Health Services Block Grant awards grants to the States to provide mental health services to people with mental disorders. Through the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant, a joint Federal-State partnership, CMHS supports existing public services and encourages the development of creative and cost-effective systems of community-based care for people with serious mental disorders. With the current changes in the health care delivery system, improving access to community-based systems is especially important. CMHS is the Federal agency that oversees State Mental Health Plans and Implementation Reports, using mental health experts for the regional consultative application review process.

Who does the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant Program serve?

o In communities throughout the United States, mental disorders affect people of all ages and in all walks of life. Almost 54 million adults in the United States are affected by mental disorders in any given year.

o Preliminary studies indicate that more than 12 million children (20 percent of all children) in the United States experience mental and emotional disturbances while growing up.

o Each year in the United States, more than 5 million adults and children are diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, severe depression, and other serious mental disorders. People with these disorders have extensive and complex needs, and most individuals quickly exhaust available insurance benefits. At that point, they and their families often turn to their States and the public system of mental health care.

What does the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant Program do?

o Because what is effective in one State may not be effective in another, the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant works in close collaboration with each State or Territory to develop and implement its own State Mental Health Plan for improving community-based services and reducing reliance on hospitalization. The program stipulates that case management be provided to individuals with the most serious mental disorders and encourages appropriate partnerships among a wide range of health, dental, mental health, vocational, housing, and educational services. The program also promotes partnerships among Federal, State, and local government agencies.

o The Community Mental Health Services Block Grant supports grassroots involvement of the major stakeholders in mental health services at both the State and the Federal levels. Each State or Territory is required to have a mental health planning council to review the State Mental Health Plan. Each council must include consumers of mental health services and family members, as well as service providers and State officials. The State also is required to seek comments from the public on its plan.

o At the Federal level, mental health planning council members-including family members, consumers, State officials, and service providers-serve as CMHS reviewers of State Mental Health Plans and Implementation Reports. They often share their expertise at regional and national technical assistance meetings.

What types of technical assistance does CMHS provide?

Five percent of funding is set aside for the Center for Mental Health Services to provide technical assistance, data collection, and evaluation activities to States and territories and their representatives, as well as mental health

o The Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program, designed to develop minimum data standards that provide a basis for uniform, comparable, high-quality statistics on mental health services;

o The National Reporting Program, the only national source of information on mental health organizations, services, and service recipients; and

o National Technical Assistance Centers: one of which evaluates systems that serve children, another of which evaluates systems that serve adults, and the third of which provides technical assistance to the States for mental health planning.

CMHS conducts national and regional technical assistance meetings dealing with the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant application process, the enhancement of existing systems of community mental health services, strategies for transitioning into a managed care environment, development of a national set of mental health objectives, and use of consumer outcome objectives.

o Community Mental Health Services Block Grant Funding

For free information about the Mental Health Block Grant Program and other CMHS programs – including publications, references, and referrals to local and national resources and organizations – call 1.800.789.2647; (TDD) 1.866.889.2647.